Health

Are There Any Risks Involved In Detoxing From Alcohol On One’s Own?

“Do not try this alone at home.” Does this sound familiar?

You have heard that before; but when it comes to alcohol detox, many people ask, “Why can’t I just stop drinking? Won’t self-detoxification quickly solve the main issue at hand?” The answer is simple: No, you could die from attempting to do so.

The two most difficult detoxifications are alcohol and Xanax-like drugs. The reason is fairly simple, but they are rarely known outside the medical community. When you drink, your body quickly acclimates to the alcohol, infusing your blood, your organs, and your brain with the toxins. After what may appear to be just a short time, as little as a few years, your body now depends on the alcohol for its normality. Simply stopping the consumption of alcohol may bring on seizures, diarrhea, delirium-tremens, tremors, excessively high heart rate, respiratory difficulties, paranoia, and elevated blood pressure. To avoid thee risks, you need to join the best addiction treatment center to let the experts perform detoxification process safely.

One of the ways to detox is to wean off alcohol over a period of time. The other way is to use medication to help trick your brain to be acting on the same receptors as alcohol. You’ll probably need an anti-seizure medication. The most important part of detox is to do it only under medical supervision, or licensed personnel, but never alone. Even if you decided to do it alone, which I highly advise against, never be alone. Always have someone there to call for help if you are suffering uncontrollable seizures, during which you can cause serious and permanent harm to yourself. There is no safe way to do it alone. Many have perished trying.

Over the first few days, you will most likely experience the following symptoms: sweating, shakiness, sleeplessness, nausea, vomiting, accelerated breathing and heart rate, and possible seizures. Next, the tremors may increase in frequency and intensity. The risk of having a seizure increases, (the second day is where seizures may occur, but certainly that is not an iron rule). You may feel dizzy and antsy. By the third day or so, you may be disoriented, confused, experiencing more tremors; you may have hallucinations between day 2 and day 4. Day 4 to 8 are a mere continuation of all this.

The risk of seizure doesn’t end until about one to two weeks. By the end of the first week, you should start to feel better, your medical condition should be stable, and you are ready to begin a true recovery.

The best way to avoid alcohol withdrawal symptoms is to not drink enough to suffer from alcohol addiction. The next best thing is to quit, intelligently, and your best approach in quitting is to enlist the help of a rehab team that is experienced and highly-trained with the diligent process of detoxification. “No pain, no gain.” You have heard it before, but when it comes to alcohol detox and recovery, it’s very real, and the gains are worth the pains. Take your first step today.

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