DietFoodHealthLifestyle

Eating well in a cafeteria-style dining hall

Have your goals clear, especially if you are at a time of altered energy needs or competition demands. Treat the dining room like a restaurant. If there is no written menu, survey the choices before you commit yourself to a queue. Look for nutrition cards that will tell you more about each dish. Decide what you will have, before you are served.

  • Don’t get into the line and keep piling more food on your plate as you pass each dish. We call this ‘compost eating’. Apart from the likelihood that you will overeat, this style of dining minimizes the sense of variety from night to night. You will quickly get bored with it.
  • Be prepared to exercise restraint with portion sizes or menu choices, even if the menu is advertised as being athlete-focused.
  • Don’t be distracted by the other foods you have not chosen for this meal. There will be other opportunities to try the things you missed today.
  • Ignore what other athletes eat. Stick to what is right for you and keep in mind that your nutritional needs and theirs may be very different.
  • Allow yourself some flexibility for special treats—but choose them well, with your nutritional goals in mind.
  • Leave the dining hall once you have finished eating. If you join those hanging out there beyond mealtimes, you will soon find yourself eating for entertainment rather than need.
  • If you need more energy than the offered meals provide, take a snack for later on—a sandwich, some fruit or some flavored yoghurt are good choices.
  • Seek help if you need information or have special food requirements. There is often a dietitian or food-service expert who can help with any queries or problems.

Road cycling enjoys a long history of organized competition: the Tour de France is more than 100 years old. Men’s road cycling is a professional sport dominated by sponsored trade teams made up of cyclists from all over the world. Many of these cyclists are household names in Europe, the heart of the racing scene.

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The successes of Australian cyclists such as Cael Evans, Mick Rogers, Robbie McEwan and Stuart O’Grady have helped to increase the profile of professional road cycling back home, and Adelaide’s Tour Down Under is now first on the calendar of international Retour races. Apart from the professional circuit, top cyclists also compete for their national teams at World Championships (annually) and the Olympic Games (every four years). Women too engage in the sport, though the professional circuit for female road cyclists is newer and less developed.

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