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Refine Your Campaign Using A/B and Multivariate Testing

Now that you have a functional albeit basic dashboard and you know how to create an ad on Facebook, it’s time for you to send your campaign into high gear. What do we mean by this? Running multiple ads and campaigns makes a lot more sense when you have the infrastructure in place to see how you’ve done and how you can improve. And that’s what you’ve built with your dashboard—a simple system for you to test cause and effect. At the end of the day, you’re looking to turn your efforts into a system where your every action can produce a somewhat predictable reaction.

In its simplest form, A/B testing is understanding the impacts of doing things two different ways. We’ll go through it in a little more detail here, assuming you are marketing a Facebook fan page. For example:

What is the average number of net new fans on days you posted content? What is the average number of net new fans on days you didn’t post new content?

  • What is the average number of net new fans you get on days you post content about international politics? Other types of content?
  • What is the cost per click on advertising run in the United States vs. the United Kingdom vs. Canada? Notice that in each case, there is an either/or. You’re evaluating two or more things but leaving every

Other variable consistent across all the things you test. 569641c06.indd 142 3/23/10 1:23:43 AM 143

■ W eek 3: R ef ine Your Campaign Using A / B and d Mu ltivariate Testing Answers to the previous questions are critical to optimizing a campaign, but only as long as you have enough activity to pass the “red-face” test of statistical validity. In other words, if you rely on a few days of feedback, you may just choose days when people are particularly or unfriendly to your cause.

Conclusion

Running things for a longer period of time will turn your hunches into knowledge. The bar is not true statistical validity but more of a feeling that you’ve run things for long enough, with different characteristics, and with enough eyeballs that you feel like you could defend the thought process to even the most demanding people in your organization.

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